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Group One
In & Out of Studio 3D
Saturday, 27 February 2016
Oh, The Possibilities
Topic: Quilting

OK, this is not technically quilting YET. What I have been doing is playing in Electric Quilt (EQ7) to design some quilt tops that I MAY turn into real quilts someday. They may look just like these or they may (more likely) be refined and edited when the fabrics are chosen.

I design quilts in several ways:

1) Find a pattern I like (free in a magazine or on the internet) and choose fabrics from my stash or purchase to make that quilt

2) Start with a pattern I like and change up the size of the blocks or the number of blocks (or both) before choosing fabrics

3) Choose a block I like and design a quilt layout around it

4) Design a block in EQ7 and then build a quilt using it

5) Grab some graph paper and start sketching patches until they form a block I like and then build a quilt around that

Here is one I started as a block on graph paper and later recreated in EQ7 so I could see what multiples would look like:


On this Pastel Plaid I recreated a single block I found in a magazine and used EQ7 to duplicate it so I could see what multiples would look like.


Once I went back to EQ7 AFTER I had made all the blocks to try out different layouts without having to keep moving them around on the design wall. I saved this layout to use some other time and did something else with the blocks I had on hand:


I had bought some fabrics that went together well and then started drawing and combining blocks in EQ7 to try for a layout I liked. As it turned out I used these fabrics for my last mystery quilt but I still have this nice design to use in the future:


This is one where I chose blocks I liked and then added fabrics and then worked on a layout that looked good to me:


I chose several paper-pieced blocks built in to EQ7 to create a possible garden layout:


And finally, I wanted to see what a paper-pieced sampler might look like if I changed them all to the same fabrics:


Oooh, I liked those corner block so much I created a layout using only them:


When I get ready to stitch one of these, EQ7 will tell me how much of each fabric I need, Give me instructions on paper-piecing, template patters and/or rotary cutting and finished sizes for the blocks and the quilt.

Can you tell I like EQ7?

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PST

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