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Group One
In & Out of Studio 3D
Thursday, 16 November 2017
Three Big Finishes
Topic: Quilting

What do you do when you have a LOT of a specialty fabric to use up and you don't like to do the same project over and over? Well, you could make three different patterns with the fabric. But it took so long to finally find a pattern that I liked for it that I didn't really want to do that.

So I cut all the parts for three quilts from the same pattern, subbing in alternate fabrics where there wasn't enough to use the same (mostly the sashings, but also the lightest squares).

I worked through them all step-by-step all at the same time - sew fabric A to B on all the quilts, then AB to C on all the quilts, etc. This followed through all the way - borders on all, backings on all, quilting all, binding all.

The whole process took a little over two weeks from cutting to binding (not working on them every day and some days only a few hours.)

Since I don't like to do the same thing over and over I changed up the quilting on each of them. The quilting choices inform the titles for the quilts.

This first one is called 'Exit 10' and the quilting is loop-the-loops. The freeway exit we go through the most has flocks of Canada Geese hanging out in the grassy areas surrounded by the ramps. The loops in the quilting represent those freeway ramps.


The second one is called 'Gander At This'. Obviously, gander refers to the geese on the feature fabric. The quilting is overall leaves. You get the best view of this in the white areas. Both the sashings andthe fabric with the open pattern have leaves.


The third quilt is named 'To Each His Own' as each fabric type is quilted in a different manner. Geese have a wavy line side to side, dark green has loops, white tree prints have trees, leafy print has leaves, plaid has 'plaid' quilting, and sashings have leaves on vines.


So, the same.... but different.

Each has binding to match its sashing.

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 3:50 PM PST

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