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Group One
In & Out of Studio 3D
Sunday, 28 April 2019
Learning Semi-Script Lettering
Topic: Bible Journaling

This series on progressive lettering styles is coming right along! This part of the series is focused on moving into semi-script.

The remarkable thing about today’s practice word is how unremarkable it is! In fact, it looks pretty much like it was written from last week’s lesson on italics.

 

However, note that the tail on the ‘e’ is just a little longer and the base of the ‘w’ is now round instead of coming to two points. The whole word is just a little more relaxed.

 

Consider it like the difference between these two typefaces:   Hebrews and Hebrews

 

Tomorrow we’ll see the many other changes that transform this style.



Although very similar to the italic oval print, the semi-script introduces little curled tails at the end of letters that would normally end on the baseline.

 

These letters do NOT connect to one another in their application which is why it is only a semi-script and not a script. But those tails actually make the letters faster to write as they help the letters to flow together and they make the text to enhance the feeling of the words being cohesive elements.

 

Today we are using the same upper-case as for the italics.



Today you can practice an alternative upper-case for the semi-script. These are more in keeping with the flowing style that allows you to make the letter forms more quickly.

 

Notice the trailing tails on the ‘A’, ‘E’, ‘L’, ‘Q’, ‘R’, ‘U’ and ‘Z’.

 



Let’s put it all together – The alternative upper-case, the italic slant, the trailing tails. But remember, we are NOT connecting out letters together.

 

Practice by writing out a block of text. I used Hebrews 4:16.

 

It is more difficult to write in this particular scale (3 units) as it is hard to keep the x-height consistently falling between those dotted lines. If this is an issue for you, consider penciling in a straight line using a ruler to establish your x-height.

 



This style of print is what my children learned in school instead of basic printing. The teachers felt it would be an easier transformation into cursive for them. In the long run, it did not make their handwriting any more readable than those children who learned standard print and then cursive! But it does make for a very nice print that reads more attractively than a rigid standard print.

 

Remember, we still always work in pencil first to establish our letter size and shapes as well as spacing. Then we ink over our letters, making corrections as desired. When the ink is dry, we erase the pencil.

 

On work such as this blank page, 1) the lettering can be written on graph or dot grid paper and traced 2) guidelines can be drawn on the page with a ruler and pencil to guide the lettering or 3) use the ghost of the printing on the following page to serve as your guidelines (this is what I did).


I love this lettering style!

Ddd

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 9:27 PM PDT

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