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Group One
In & Out of Studio 3D
Sunday, 12 May 2019
Put a New Slant On It
Topic: Bible Journaling

In this week's lettering lesson series we are going to focus exclusively on various slants for script lettering.

 

Throughout this week we will be exploring the use of various slants on script lettering and the effect it has on the ‘character’ of the written text.

 

The sample today applies no slant whatsoever – a true upright. You can use whatever letter styles you have adopted from the options presented in the script styles studied so far. To write the upright, make sure to align the ascenders and descenders on a vertical.

 

Sketch out the letters lightly in pencil, correct until they are exactly as you want them, trace over the pencil with pen and then, when the ink is dry, erase the pencil.



To begin preparing for the extreme slant script, mark on your paper a box that is 3 units wide and three units high. Draw a line from corner to corner, creating a 45-degree angled line. Then, mark a series of lines on that same angle for practice.

 

Now, as you begin writing your alphabet, make a pencil line for the angle and then draw the letter over it – following the angled line to establish the core lean. (You will have pencil lines where I am showing pink guides.)

 

Continue drawing guidelines and letters all the way through the alphabet. Even when you move on to using this style in a project, draw these guidelines as you go. DO NOT try to ‘wing it’ as your angle will tend to revert to your own natural slant and you will lose continuity.

 

On a project, you will ink your letters and erase the pencil guidelines. On this practice sheet, leave the pencil guides in place for future reference.

 



To begin preparing for the full upright script, mark on your paper vertical lines that are three units high. Make a series of lines on that same angle for practice.

 

As you write your alphabet, make a pencil line for the angle and then draw the letter over it – following the vertical line to establish the core. (You will have pencil lines where I am showing pink guides.)

 

Continue drawing guidelines and letters all the way through the alphabet. Even when you move on to using this style in a project, draw these guidelines as you go. DO NOT try to ‘wing it’ as your angle will tend to revert to your own natural slant and you will lose continuity.

 

On a project, you will ink your letters and erase the pencil guidelines. On this practice sheet, leave the pencil guides in place for future reference.



As before, we will draw a box with an angled line to establish the angle of the core of our letters. Mark on your paper a box that is 3 units wide and 2 units high. Draw a line from upper left to lower right, creating a backhand angle. Then, mark a series of lines on that same angle for practice.

 

To write the alphabet, make a pencil line for the angle and then draw the letter over it – following the angled line to establish the core lean. (You will have pencil lines where I am showing pink guides.)

 

Continue drawing guidelines and letters all the way through the alphabet. Even when you move on to using this style in a project, draw these guidelines as you go. DO NOT try to ‘wing it’ as your angle will tend to revert to your own natural slant and you will lose continuity.

 

On a project, you will ink your letters and erase the pencil guidelines. On this practice sheet, leave the pencil guides in place for future reference.

 



Each of the alphabets we studied this week have their own character because of the angle on the letters. Once you choose a scripture to write in the book of Nehemiah in your Bible, select the alphabet slant that best establishes the spirit of the text.

 

Sketch out your angled guidelines along with the letters lightly in pencil, correct until they are exactly as you want them, trace over the pencil with pen and then, when the ink is dry, erase the pencil. I used the extreme slant because it showed more ‘strength’ than the other two alphabets.


Isn't it amazing how the slant changes the entire character of these alphabets?

Ddd

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 10:03 PM PDT

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