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Group One
In & Out of Studio 3D
Saturday, 28 September 2019
Three In One
Topic: Bible Journaling

As our group is working on journaling in the bible 'cover to cover' the goal is to have something done in every book by the end of the year. We are alternating between Old Testament front to back and New Testament back to front. Since there are many more Old Testament books, sometimes a set of short ones will be combined into one week. So this week we did various activities in Joel, Amos and Obadiah. (I misspelled Obadiah in several places throughout my samples!)

Here is the lettering lesson for the week:

 

JOEL/AMOS/OBADIAH: Day 1 – Flourish – Introduction

This is probably the fanciest font we have introduced here in the Lettering Lodge. But it, too, is not really as complicated as it looks – just several steps to get you there.

Follow along with the basic building process shown on the letter ‘A’.

1)      Sketch out the basic letter skeleton

2)      Add the flourishes

3)      Make teardrop ends where indicated

4)      Sketch in flowers and trimmings AND ink them

5)      Ink rest of letter without actually touching the flower

6)      Thicken midlines but not the ends of lines

Do the same steps on the ‘J’ and the ‘O’ and write in the rest of the words in script. Note relative size and placement of script letters.


 

 

JOEL/AMOS/OBEADIAH: Day #2 – Flourish – Alphabet

The Flourish alphabet has a few elements that are common across multiple letters. These are the bones that make the alphabet cohesive. First practice these structures – you will recognize them when you are making your letter skeletons. Follow the step-by-step shown for the letter ‘A’ as you draw EVERY letter in the alphabet.

1)      Used on B, D, E, F, P, R

2)      Used on H, M, N, T, Y

3)      Used on I, J, K, L

4)      Used on V, W

5)      Used on ALL LETTERS

 


 

 


 

 

JOEL/AMOS/OBADIAH: Day #3 – Flourish – Lower-Case

The lower-case alphabet used with the Flourish capitals is a delicate script with faux-brush styling. Note that this is built on the same framework as the upper-case (4 units high) but the baseline is raised one unit and the x-height is at the midline. The ascender is ½ unit lower than the full 4th unit.

Draw base letter with pencil, ink it, then draw a second line along the downstrokes and fill in with pen. Erase pencil.

When this is combined with the Flourish font it creates an elegant word.


 

 

JOEL/AMOS/OBADIAH: Day #4 – Flourish – Practice

Today, select a verse from one of the three featured books and letter it using the Flourish font. Don’t you love the way this looks?

I made the flowers and trimmings with a dark purple marker and brushed over them with a lighter purple to create a ‘glow’. This was done before inking the letters.


 

 

JOEL/AMOS/OBADIAH: Day #5 – Flourish – Bible Page

Create a bible page in one of the featured books using the Flourish font. My words were short so I was able to keep the original scale of 4 units using the lines in my margin.

For the flowers and trimmings, I drew them in using black and then used a bleed-free marker to color over them.

The lighthouse is from this week’s Drawing Room.


Whew! That is some intensive lettering - doable but time consuming. But isn't it awesome when it is done?

Ddd

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 22 September 2019
Lettering In The Letter... To The Galatians
Topic: Bible Journaling

After using this style of lettering on a couple of recent projects I decided I wanted to do a full set of lessons so that YOU could do it too!

GALATIANS: Day 1 – Unicals – Introduction

This week’s lettering is an old-fashioned style that looks complicated to duplicate. But it is really based on a basic oval. And since the flourishes share common elements it is really quite easy to accomplish.

Here are step-by-step guides to get you through writing the sample word for this week: Galatians.

 


 

 

 

GALATIANS: Day 2 – Unicals – Alphabet

For this alphabet you can see there are basically the ‘round’ letters and the ‘straight’ letters. I’ve given you a red guide for each that will show you what your basis will be. This is followed by the addition of the elements that turn it into a completed letter.

There are a few things to point out that unify the letters. The curved letters have a bulging line that comes to a rounded point along the midline. Only a few straight lines have a bulge (A, K, X, Z). These are always on a single line, not a double. These letters have serifs. Sometimes they are dipped (tops of B, D, N, M, P). Some are angled (C, G, S). Then there are triangles (L, T, Z). Watch for the teardrop ends on A, B, D, G, J, K, N, P, R, U and X.

Finally, there are two letters that are truly unique but are in keeping with the original uncial alphabet. These would be E and W. If you truly don’t like these, change them up. The E could have the long right bar removed and replaced with two angled ends like the C. The W could be replaced by an inverted M.

 


 

 

 

GALATIANS: Day 3 – Unicals – Practice Words

Practice writing a phrase or scripture with the new alphabet. In your Pencil-Ink-Erase methods, actually draw in the ovals and the posts to begin with as it will help with not only your letter formation, but your spacing as well. Try using a color fill on your letters.

 


 

 

 

GALATIANS: Day 4 – Unicals – Scripture Writing

Work on making larger and smaller versions of the letters as well as centering. Do you find it easier to write the letters now? You should be getting a feel for where the various style elements fit in which will make it easier to write. Did you change out those Es and Ws?

Do you have a gold gel pen? If so, use that for your letter fills. This is a style that will especially benefit from it.

 


 

 

 

GALATIANS: Day 5 – Unicals – Bible Page

Because of all that practice, the writing of this long block of text went fairly quickly. I did compress some letters in ‘deceived’ and ‘mocked’ so I would not cover too much of the text. This time, I used a silver glitter gel pen for the letter fills.

Find a scripture in your bible, Galatians if possible, to use this font. This page also uses the dandelions from the Drawing Room lesson of the week.

 


Give this one a try!

Ddd

 

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 15 September 2019
Hooray For Hosea
Topic: Bible Journaling

On we go with lettering lessons every week. This week we are up to Hosea with these lessons:

HOSEA: Day #1 – Overstated Serifs – Introduction

The base shapes for this new lettering style come from the Basic Oval Print. From there, double lines have been added and the serifs are hugely overstated.

This sample uses a letter height of 5 units with an x-height of 3 units. Other options will be explored as we progress through the week.

 


 

 

 

HOSEA: Day #2 – Overstated Serifs – Alphabet

This page of letters was done without the dot-grid paper. This will help you get a feel for the letter relationships which is much more important than having exact measurements. For example, you may wish to have the double lines wider or thinner, you may want the actual letters wider or thinner, or you may want the x-height to be higher or lower. Make it your own! You can write up the alphabet with any of these options knowing that you can change to a different formula when you use it in a project. Color is optional at this stage.

 


 

 

 

HOSEA: Day #3 – Overstated Serifs – Options

Today we are going to incorporate some of the changes we discussed yesterday. So write out the words that describe the options being demonstrated.

This is a great font to use with simple pattern doodles, to experiment with color, to toss about off the baseline and to mix cases. You can also experiment here with those size variations. If you think of more options, write them out and give it a try.

 


 

 

 

HOSEA: Day #4 – Overstated Serifs – Scripture Work

Use one or more of your variations (or the original alphabet) to write up a scripture from Hosea. I am loving those curls on the descenders of the y and g, the tails of the R and the arms of the f and r.

Don’t forget to use capitals on all of the initial letters of the words. It adds continuity and gives you more practice on the upper-case.

 


 

 

 

HOSEA: Day #5 – Overstated Serifs – In Your Bible

For my bible page I varied the letter sizes slightly, tossed them off the baseline and colored them with a range of teals and blues. I combined the verse in Hosea with the lesson from the Drawing Room (raindrops).

 


And in the drawing lesson for the week, I taught them how to do the raindrops!

Ddd

 

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 8 September 2019
Lettering In The Lion's Den
Topic: Bible Journaling

This week, the lettering lessons are from the book of Daniel.

DANIEL: Day #1 – Jubilant Script – Introduction

The lettering this week is a combination of styles, including some invented forms! The lower-case is a fairly straight-forward upright round script (at least in the letters in our sample word.) A few more creative forms will appear in the full alphabet tomorrow.

The upper-case is a very carefree, casual style in which some letters are wide and some narrow. The one thing the all have in common is the little ‘hook’.

The relationship between the cases is extreme. Upper-case is four units while lower-case has an x-height of one unit, an ascender of three units and a descender of one unit.

Somehow it all works!

 


 

 

 

DANIEL: Day #2 – Jubilant Script – Alphabet

The markings on the left side of the sample graphic are a reminder of the relative letter sizes in this combination of script letters. The letters in the upper-case are so casual that there are very few common elements to watch for, other than the little hook. Some are wide letters and some narrow. You’ll just have to study each letter and get a feel for the shape of it.

In the lower-case, you’ll find mostly standard script formations. The ‘d’ does have a pronounced backhand as does the ‘v’.

When using the lower-case in projects, do as with any other script in designing your own letter connections.

 


 

 

 

DANIEL: Day #3 – Jubilant Script – Writing Practice

The best way to become comfortable with this lettering style is to just use it. This gives practice with letter formation, letter and word spacing, and letter connections.

Since the casual style of the upper-case is really the feature, when you are writing out blocks of text, use capitals to begin all words.

 


 

 

 

DANIEL: Day #4 – Jubilant Script – Scripture Writing

This alphabet usually calls for lots of practice before it starts feeling natural. Are you remembering our lettering mantra: Pencil-Ink-Erase? Drawing (sketching) the letters in pencil first lets you make adjustments and corrections in the forms and the spacing until it is just like you want it. Inking over the penciled lines trains your eye and brain to learn the forms and write them more naturally. Erasing the pencil makes your work ready for presentation.

Choose a scripture from Daniel to write using this week’s ‘Jubilant’ script.

 


 

 

 

DANIEL: Day #5 – Jubilant Script – Bible Page

This lettering style makes a good choice for a quotation because it looks more like personal handwriting. It is that mix between the overstated casualness of the upper-case and the slightly more formal lower-case. It just looks spontaneous!

I used a paraphrase of Daniel’s declaration in my Bible, along with this week’s Drawing Lesson of the ‘lion’.

 


Another week completed.

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 1 September 2019
New Lettering In Ephesians
Topic: Bible Journaling

You may wonder why I label all of these lettering lessons as 'Bible Journaling' instead of 'Lettering'. It is simple, really. If it weren't for the bible journaling, I wouldn't be teaching lettering. Also, I use the bible for all of the samples. And further, the final part of the lesson is always a page from my bible that I completed with the lettering lesson.

This time the book featured is Ephesians.

EPHESIANS: Day #1 – Versals – Introduction

This lettering style is another that requires a step-by-step process for completion. It is called ‘versals’ and was introduced by Joanne Fink in her book Complete Guide to Bible Journaling. The steps are illustrated in the graphic below:

1)      In pencil, write out your word in basic upper-case print with indented wide serifs.

2)      Draw on each side of the lines to create concave shapes that meet with the serifs.

3)      Use ink to trace the outside lines of your newly created letters. Erase pencil.

4)      Use fine pen to doodle on the letters however you wish. Color as desired.

Today, practice writing the word EPHESIANS by following the four steps.

 


 

 

 

EPHESIANS: Day #2 – Versals – Alphabet

The full alphabet is to be considered an idea guide rather than a pattern this week. Since your own printing in the first step will likely be different than mine, your finished letters will most certainly be different.

When you get to the stage of doodling, try to come up with a variety of ideas. When you are using the letters in a project the doodles can be switched out to fit a theme, replicated throughout to add continuity or just be random.

I added script words underneath my samples to serve as inspiration for the doodles and to make the page more decorative. It is not part of the exercise, though.

 


 

 

 

EPHESIANS: Day #3 – Versals – Practice Words

This is a demonstration of how your original printing can affect the outcome of your finished piece. On the first three lines I used a very basic print, first in three units then in four units.

On the last three lines I intentionally varied the size of the printing and exaggerated their shapes. Look how much more relaxed this text becomes. I also practiced creating more doodle styles to build up my catalog of choices.

 


 

 

 

EPHESIANS: Day #4 – Versals – Creative Application

I wanted to explore other ways to use these fun letters, beyond just printing blocks of text. I first laid out lines for the spacing of the shelves and then drew the letters with wider than normal spacing between them. Then I Drew the pots around the letters, varying the heights, and finally, added a variety of plants.

I used four reddish-browns for the pots and colored the letters solid, regardless of their doodle patterns. A variety of greens for the plants brings this scripture into focus.

 


 

 

 

EPHESIANS: Day #5 – Versals – Bible Page

I really think the versals look better in large format lettering as the doodles are more easily seen. Shrinking down to this size can make them appear cluttered. I try to alleviate that by coloring in solidly instead of focusing on the doodling.

This lettering style works well in a vertical format as you can see. The artist palette is from the weekly Drawing Room tutorial.

 


So there you have it - another week of lessons and a new style of lettering for you to try.

Ddd

 

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 25 August 2019
Lettering in Ezekiel
Topic: Bible Journaling

A new lettering lesson is in the queue for today:

 

EZEKIEL: Day #1 – Full Hearts – Intro

Here is another font based on the Basic Block Print. We are working in the book of Ezekiel this week so I have written out the book name in the new font.

This looks a little complicated so I’ll show you how easy it is to do (second graphic). There are 5 steps. 1) In pencil, draw a heart that is 5 units wide and 3 ½ units tall. The top point drops down ½ unit. 2) a rectangle that is 3 units tall and 2 units wide is layered over the heart at an angle. 3) Use the rectangle as a size guide to construct your block letter. 4) With ink, trace the outer edge of the heart and the outline of the letter where it rests inside the heart. Leave the overhanging parts of the letter (outside the heart) as unfinished lines. 5) erase the pencil guides.


 

 


 

 

EZEKIEL: Day #2 – Full Hearts – Alphabet

Here is a repeat of the instructions on constructing these letters. For consistency, I cut a heart hollow out of a piece of paper as well as the correct measurement of the rectangle. Then I could simply trace these ‘stencils’ with my pencil.

There are 5 steps, shown in the first graphic. 1) In pencil, draw a heart that is 5 units wide and 3 ½ units tall. The top point drops down ½ unit. 2) a rectangle that is 3 units tall and 2 units wide is layered over the heart at an angle. 3) Use the rectangle as a size guide to construct your block letter. 4) With ink, trace the outer edge of the heart and the outline of the letter where it rests inside the heart. Leave the overhanging parts of the letter (outside the heart) as unfinished lines. 5) erase the pencil guides.


 

 


 

 

EZEKIEL: Day #3 – Full Hearts – Crossword

Generally, you would not be writing out whole words with a font as complicated as this – although a title on a page or a keyword might be done. But I wanted you to get lots of practice, so today we will make a crossword.


 

 

EZEKIEL: Day #4 – Full Hearts – Scripture Writing

For writing out this scripture, I used the Full Hearts font as the first letter of each word and completed the remainder in 1x2 simple upper-case letters.


 

 

EZEKIEL: Day #5 – Full Hearts – Bible Page

The use of the font in my bible page is similar to yesterday’s scripture page. There are, however, three distinctions: 1) the hearts are tilted a bit, this way and that. 2) the hearts are colored as a background to the letters, which makes them easier to read. 3) I finished the words in script instead of print which adds more formality.

The heart from the Drawing Room was done on vellum, cut out and glued down with a dry adhesive.


That is quite a unique lettering style is it not?

Ddd

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 18 August 2019
No Lament - It's Lamentations
Topic: Bible Journaling

Next lettering lesson is due and we've worked our way to Lamentations. Here are the 5 days of lessons:

LAMENTATIONS: Day #1 – Art Deco – Intro

The alphabet font we will focus on this week is based on the Basic Oval Print but is really a half-oval. You do not notice the overall styling too much in the upper case (at least with the letters used today). But you can definitely see the ‘art deco’ make its self-evident when we work in the lower case.

Work with an overall letter height of four units. Crossbars fall at the ¾ mark or down at the ¼ mark. The upper-case ‘I’ gets serifs even though this is not a serif font.

Try out these two words for a start and we’ll jump into the full alphabet tomorrow.


 

 

LAMENTATIONS: Day #2 – Art Deco – Alphabet

There’s that classic art deco look. Yesterday we did not see any styling evident in the upper-case letters we used, but now you’ll take note of the classic sweeping curves that open the B, D, P and R. The J and K share a different sort of opening sweep. Note the little overhangs where a half-oval crosses a straight line.

As to scale, the x-height is 3 units of the overall height of 4 units. The descender is only 1 unit.

Once again, we get a full set of numbers with this font.



 

 


 

 

LAMENTATIONS: Day #3 – Art Deco – Hymn Lyrics

A fun way to practice getting the letter spacing and word spacing correct is to write lyrics to hymns. Did you realize that some of the lyrics to Great Is Thy Faithfulness come from Lamentations? Here it is from the King James Bible: Lamentations 3:22-23 - It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness.

When writing blocks of text, I like to use Upper-case to begin every word.


 

 

LAMENTATIONS: Day #4 – Art Deco – Scripture

Today we will write another block of text – this time a scripture from Lamentations. With the scripture reference you get to practice working on a smaller scale – 2 units high with 1 ½ units as the x-height.


 

 

LAMENTATIONS: Day #5 – Art Deco – Bible Page

For this bible page in Lamentations I shrank my letters down to 2 units. You can actually get a lot of text in this font as it is compressed horizontally by nature.

My scripture selection worked well with the magnifying glass from the weekly Drawing Room lesson.


Have YOU tried any of these lettering lessons?

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 10:24 PM PDT
Sunday, 11 August 2019
Lettering in Philippians
Topic: Bible Journaling

We’re in for a real adventure this week!

PHILIPPIANS: Day #1 – Funky Print – Introduction

The alphabet we are creating to play with this week is based on the Basic Round Print. So you can easily see that relationship, I have written out the basic followed by the Funky Print with all the bells and whistles.

You can decorate your letters as you wish but do try to make changes from one letter to another to maintain the funky feeling.


 

PHILIPPIANS: Day #2 – Funky Print – Alphabet

Although this entire alphabet is based on the Basic Round Print, it is only a jumping off point. Many of the letter shapes have changed to suit the slightly whacky style. For instance, the ‘g’ and ‘q’ do not descend below the baseline and have severe curves in their stems. Both of the ‘j’s have a distinct back slant and the ‘u’s are almost closed at the top.

Begin by writing the Basic Round Print in pencil. Make changes to the letter shapes as you wish, then ink the NEW basic shapes with a very heavy pen. Finally, use a very fine tip pen to make funky decorations on your letters. To create some unity, I used some elements repeatedly (stripes, dots, triangles, flags, squiggles).

If you don’t like the way I have decorated a letter, just change it to suit yourself.


 

PHILIPPIANS: Day #3 – Funky Print – Going Digital

A crazy alphabet deserves an equally craze set of numbers. Note that these numerals use many of the same decorative elements as the alphabet.


 

PHILIPPIANS: Day #4 – Funky Print – Write It Out

This is the perfect alphabet to bounce off the baseline. Because of all the wild decorations I wanted to find a way to have a little bit of control so it would not look sloppy. I found that raising every other letter one unit off the baseline worked very well.  Capitals and full-height lower-case letters are not bounced. I also added a bit of slant here and there. You could also add color for even more fun.

Your assignment today is to use your funky letters to write a scripture from Philippians for practice.


 

PHILIPPIANS: Day #5 – Funky Print – Bible Page

The task for today is to use your new Funky Print to journal a scripture in your bible. I used Philippians 3:14 and combined it with the trophy cup from this week’s Drawing Room tutorial.

There is much less bounce used here than on yesterday’s journal page. Instead, I used slanted letters and occasionally made a few letters smaller to accommodate the long words in the narrow margin. The good news is that, with this font, it allows a lot of leeway while still looking good.


 

What a ride!

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 9:57 PM PDT
Sunday, 4 August 2019
Spying Out Letters For Jeremiah
Topic: Bible Journaling

The consistent look of this lettering is all in the details. It looks deceptively simple but it does take careful attention to get it just right:

JEREMIAH: Day #1 – Bulging Rectangles – Intro

Getting the curved sides for these letters ‘just right’, is not as hard as one might think – thankfully.

Begin by using a pencil and making a box for each letter. Most will be two units wide by four units tall. (the letter ‘I’ is one unit wide while the ‘M’ and ‘W’ are four units wide.) Then draw the letter shape by making the corner start just on the inside of the dot and bulge to the outside of the dots and back into the corner on the inside of the dot. Repeat for all lines.

Note that there are a few straight lines (crosspieces on ‘E’, ‘A’ and ‘H’) and a few overhangs (center of ‘E’ and upper left of ‘M’). Tomorrow we’ll see more of these but these will get you through this introductory word.


 

JEREMIAH: Day #2 – Bulging Rectangles – Alphabet 1

Review of the process of making the Bulging Rectangles Font: Begin by using a pencil and making a box for each letter. Most will be two units wide by four units tall. (the letter ‘I’ is one unit wide while the ‘M’ and ‘W’ are four units wide.) Then draw the letter shape by making the corner start just on the inside of the dot and bulge to the outside of the dots and back into the corner on the inside of the dot. Repeat for all lines.

Note that there are a few straight lines (crosspieces on ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘E’, ‘F’, ‘G’, ‘H’, ‘J’, ‘X’, and ‘Z’ plus uprights on ‘D’, ‘I’, ‘M’, ‘Q’, ‘T’ and ‘Y’) There are a few overhangs (center of ‘E’, ‘F’, ‘G’, ‘Q’, ‘X’, ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ plus the upper left of ‘M’ and ‘N’).

Because of the unique construction of this set of letters you’ll need to match them with numbers and punctuation. So those are included as well. Study those for the straight lines, and overhangs that make them fit with the alphabet.


 

JEREMIAH: Day #3 – Bulging Rectangles – Alphabet 2

I wanted you to have something to use as a lower-case with the main alphabet so I developed a similar bulging half-size font. After I put this together, I realized that it works very well on its own as well.

The general shaping is done the same as on the larger font but the size of the letters is 2x2. The exceptions are, again, the ‘I’ at 1x2 and the ‘M’ and ‘W’ at 3x2.


 

JEREMIAH: Day #3 – Bulging Rectangles – Alphabet 2

I wanted you to have something to use as a lower-case with the main alphabet so I developed a similar bulging half-size font. After I put this together, I realized that it works very well on its own as well.

The general shaping is done the same as on the larger font but the size of the letters is 2x2. The exceptions are, again, the ‘I’ at 1x2 and the ‘M’ and ‘W’ at 3x2.


 

JEREMIAH: Day #5 – Bulging Rectangles – Bible Page

Use either, or both, of the alphabets to journal a scripture in Jeremiah in your Bible. I had a fairly short block of text to write so I was able to use the taller letters quite effectively.

The shape of these letters made me think of how you could hold them in two hands (especially the M and W) so that led to the pairing them with the binoculars from the Drawing Room.

I did use the smaller letter set for the scripture reference at the bottom of the page.


 

Wrapping up another week of lessons! Keep practicing.

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 28 July 2019
Isaiah Lettering - Week 30 in the series
Topic: Bible Journaling

I find it hard to believe that this is week 30 of this progressive learning of lettering series. But, because many weeks (like this one) contain more than one alphabet, I have totally lost track of the total number that have been taught. Here are the daily lessons for this week:

ISAIAH: Day #1 – Quirky Prints – Intro

We are going to work with a couple of quirky print styles this week. In this introductory piece you will find the book of Isaiah written out in each using an all-caps and an upper- and lower-case.

The styles are similar with their curled ends but the letter forms often change up. The first letters are closer to standard print and the second alphabet adds open circles to the line ends and hash marks on the long lines.


 

 

ISAIAH: Day #2 – Quirky Prints – Alphabet 1

This is the full alphabet for the first of our quirky prints.  Get relaxed with those sweeping curls on this casual style.

Although the sample shows the lower-case smaller, the actual size of it is ½ of the full letter height. I made them smaller to conserve space on my paper! Also, note that the letter forms sometimes break out of the confines of their normal baseline and ascender lines. To demonstrate this, draw in a baseline and ascender on the sample.

In use on a project, this is a good alphabet to bounce off the baseline for added interest.


 

 

ISAIAH: Day #3 – Quirky Prints – Alphabet 2

The second alphabet is similar to the first but many of the letter forms are changed (see the ‘a’ in both alphabets). In addition, the curls end in little open circles as do many of the other lines. We also add two or three hashmarks on the letters for a little ‘zippiness’.

I used black and red pens to differentiate between the capitals and lower-case letters. AND you get a set of numbers to go with them.

This font also looks great when bounced off the baseline.


 

 

ISAIAH: Day #4 – Quirky Print 1 – Writing Scripture

Today we will practice using one of the new alphabets to write scripture. I used the first form introduced and kept it more formal by maintaining the baseline.

Note the change in the letter ‘Y’ where I shortened the main ‘v’ of it. Remember, you can always make an alphabet your own by editing the letter forms to suit yourself. Just remember to use them consistently throughout your piece.


 

 

ISAIAH: Day #5 – Quirky Print 2 – In Your Bible

Whichever of this week’s alphabets you did NOT use yesterday will be used today in your Bible. This alphabet 2 combines nicely with a casual script, a sketchy double-lined print and a controlled formal script.

I used different coloring on the various parts of these letters, echoing the colors in the drawing.


Quirky letters, indeed! Right?

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 21 July 2019
Lettering in Colossians
Topic: Bible Journaling

Here is a nice departure from the standard lettering!

COLOSSIANS: Day #1 – Icon Blocks – Intro

This week we are going to have some fun experimenting with the insertion of little icons into Basic Block Letters. The block alphabet I am using is a casual mix of upper- and lower-case letters.

For this sample I have used tiny fruits to substitute for the holes in letters that usually have one and as an added layer on other letters.

I colored in the fruits as well as the base letters.


 

COLOSSIANS: Day #2 – Icon Blocks – Alphabet

You can see in this full alphabet how the icons fit into the design of the letters. In case you find it difficult to distinguish the fruit shapes as they are layered, I included a line of them separately.

It is often useful to have a number style included but I would not use the icons on these.

When using the letters in writing of text, keep in mind that you can use whatever fruit you want on whichever letter. No rules! Also, keep in mind that the fruit on the letter B can be colored as either a lemon or a lime. The fruit on the letter I can be a slice of lemon or an orange. The same is true of the fruit on the E. The fruit on the C can be an apricot, peach or a red or purple plum. There are many colors of apples, so pick your favorite.


 

COLOSSIANS: Day #3 – Icon Blocks – Other Icons

Fruit is not the only icons you can use on your block letters. Try a few words using the icons shown below. What other icons can you think of to use?


 

COLOSSIANS: Day #4 – Icon Blocks – Word Layouts

This lettering style is a very nice one to overlap and let them bounce around off the baseline.

In the first sample I overlapped the letters – always with the letter to the left tucked behind. I also changed the icons to buttons and then added little ‘stitches’ around the letters. This might be fun to use with Colossians 3:12 – “Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.”

On the second sample I still overlapped the letters but I kept the baseline more consistent. When the second line was penciled in, I made the tops of those letters conform to the bases of the letters above. This set got the wonky stars icons.


 

COLOSSIANS: Day #5 – Icon Blocks – Bible Page

For my Bible page I reverted back to the original design with the fruit filling. I did overlap my letters and let them bounce off the baseline. I combined the Icon Block lettering with a plain script that would not compete for attention.

The fruit in the illustration can be found in the Drawing Room tutorial(s) for the week. There you will learn to draw the apple, the pear and the grapes!


 

I had a lot of fun with these Icon Block Letters. How about you?

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 14 July 2019
Solomon or Songs?
Topic: Bible Journaling

Okay, the ongoing debate – do we call this book Song of Solomon or Song of Songs? It depends on what translation one is reading from! Both are acceptable. Now, on with the lettering:

SONG OF SONGS: Day #1 – Half Blocks – Intro

The fonts we will learn this week are what I call ‘half blocks’. They are kind of a cross between a block letter and a basic oval print with serifs. The x-height is over half the total height of the capitals.

Note that the loose ends of the ‘basic oval’ portion end in a curl (like last week’s letters) and the serifs have added little bits on them. The capital letters have four graduated dots alongside them and the lower-case have three dots. These are always along one side or the other of the block portion of the letter.

The letters can be colored in a number of ways which we will explore throughout the week.


 

 

SONG OF SONGS: Day #2 – Half Blocks – Alphabet

Here is the full alphabet for the half blocks. Note the finishing curls on the single lines, the extensions on the serifs and the dots next to the block side of the letters.

I colored these to distinguish between the upper- and lower-cases.


 

 

SONG OF SONGS: Day #3 – Half Blocks – Décor Options

There are a lot of ways to customize these letters. A few are shown below:

1)      Use two values of the same color to fill in a blend from top to bottom, with darker on the bottom.

2)      Use two colors to create a blend from top to bottom. As before, use the darker color on the bottom.

3)      Less decorating: Leave off the extensions on the serifs and don’t add the dots.

4)      Leave off the dots and the color. Fill the block portions with ‘S’ curls to look like wrought iron.

5)      Move the dots inside the block portions. A coloring option is to use two hues and alternate letters.

6)      Collapse the blocks and extend the internal lines outside the letter confines. Blend color side to side.


 

 

SONG OF SONGS: Day #4a – Half Blocks – Concave

This alphabet was introduced at the end of yesterday’s lesson. It does not have the dots or the serifs and we have collapsed the block portions into concave bars.

In the alphabet shown only a few of the lines are extended outside the confines of the letters. Note that you can play with the ending curls, too. See how you like them compared to the first alphabet.


 

 

SONG OF SONGS: Day #4b – Half Blocks – Casual

Here is a more informal version of the half block letter. Note that the bars are still collapsed but instead of the extensions outside the letter confines we get very loose with the basic oval portions. See how they cross over into the bars in a very casual manner.

When you are using this alphabet in a written piece and have two of the same letter together in a word, find a way to change the form of one of the letters so they look more spontaneous.


 

 

SONG OF SONGS: Day #5 – Half Blocks – Bible Page

For this Bible page I used the original half block alphabet all in caps and moved the dots to be internal decoration. This was combined with a faux-brush script to maintain a formal look.

The blend of yellow to green within the letters echoes the coloring of the lily of the valley from the weekly Drawing Room tutorial.


 

 

I’ve always been a little confused by this book of the bible, but there is beautiful imagery to journal.

Ddd

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 7 July 2019
A Time For Ecclesiastes
Topic: Bible Journaling

Gonna have to WORK it this week…

ECCLESIASTES: Day #1 – Related Curls – Intro

We’re going to go all out this week and learn THREE alphabets! Why? Because they are all based on the Basic Oval Print and they share many of the same decorative elements. There are enough changes to make it obvious that they are separate styles but close enough to demonstrate how little changes can have a big impact.

The nice thing in knowing all three of these alphabets is that you can see where you could borrow a letter form from one to use with the decorative elements of another. For instance, if you like the shape of the ‘a’ in the 2nd and 3rd you could borrow it to use in the 1st.

Practice with these three and we’ll visit the full alphabet for the first one tomorrow.


 

 

ECCLESIASTES: Day #2 – Related Curls – Alphabet 1

This alphabet is curlier than the other two with at least one, but sometimes two curls per letter. I usually replace the star on the ‘I’ and ‘j’ with little curled dots.

This sample shows very round bowls on the letters but we are actually going to use oval bowls so it looks more like the other two alphabets used this week. The x-height is just slightly taller than ½ of the letter height.

Note that some of the curls are a continuation of a round part of a letter so they are curved all the way around. Others are an extension off of a straight part of a letter so they start with a little corner and then dip into a curl. Note also that these are SMALL curls, not big swoops like the ‘Leading Loops’ font learned not too long ago.



 

ECCLESIASTES: Day #3 – Related Curls – Alphabet 2

This alphabet retains a few of the loops from yesterday’s piece but many of them have been converted to serifs. None of these letters has more than one curl.

In addition, every letter has one (and only one) vertical line doubled – always on the left side. Again, you could dot the ‘I’ and ‘j’ with curls if desired.

The x-height is exactly ½ of the letter height.



 

 

ECCLESIASTES: Day #4 – Related Curls – Alphabet 3

This alphabet retains some of the curls from the first two alphabets and adds some shaping to the oversized serifs. X-height is slightly over ½ of the letter height.

The most notable feature of this alphabet is the triple lines on the verticals. These may sometimes be on the right side of the letter (unlike yesterday’s). There are also some unique letter forms like the ‘f’ and ‘g’.

Because this is a more complicated style, there is a step-by-step guide at the bottom for drawing and inking.


 

 

ECCLESIASTES: Day #5 – Related Curls – In Your Bible

Today, use one of the three alphabets from this week’s lessons on a page in your bible. The three styles are closely enough related that they do not mix together well. If you want to combine with another font, use something very plain.

I used alphabet #3 for this page in Ecclesiastes. As an optional feature, I added color to the triple-bar section of the letters. This page was decorated with the ‘Hibiscus’ from the Drawing Room lesson of the week.



 

 

Wow! Three alphabets in one week. What a bonus.

Ddd

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 8:28 PM PDT
Sunday, 30 June 2019
Lettering in the Books of 1 and 2 Thessalonians
Topic: Bible Journaling

One alphabet for two books. In order to fit all 66 books into 52 weeks of the year, a few were combined. This is one such week.

THESSALONIANS: Day #1 – Wedged – Introduction

We explored a few alternatives to the Basic Block Lettering when it was first introduced early in the year. All of those were significant departures from the base form. Now, I want to show you how to make some minor changes to the font and still create a very unique alphabet.

We’re going to do this a step at a time so you can learn how design edits are initiated and become a participant in the design process.

For today, practice with this introductory word to get a taste of the end goal.



 

 

THESSALONIANS: Day #2a – Wedged – Review Blocks

As the first step in this design overhaul, you will want to review the root form of the Basic Block Alphabet. However, our new alphabet will need an altered form to begin with. We want a letter that uses elements of 3 units high by 1 unit wide.

First, write out a new alphabet based on those dimensions. This will be your template for the redesign.

When you have that done, move on to the next graphic.


 

 

THESSALONIANS: Day #2b – Wedged – Changing Font

Using the ABC graphic below, note how the Basic Block is transformed. Column 1 is the base letter; column 2 substitutes the vertical for a wedge that is the 1 unit width at the top and narrows to a point that is centered on the base of the element; column 3 shows the final result. Note that, when the vertical has a curved top, like in the letter C, the wedge is vertical on the inside edge, slanted on the outside edge and follows the curve at the top.

Use your practice piece from graphic 1 to see how many of the forms you can get right.

The graphic at the right demonstrates a lower-case alphabet that uses narrow wedges (1/2 unit wide) to modify the verticals of the Basic Round Print. Try creating a full alphabet for this as well.

We’ll get to see both of these full alphabets tomorrow so you can evaluate how well you did.


 

 

THESSALONIANS: Day #3 – Wedged – Alphabets

So, how well did you do yesterday? Check your invented alphabet against the one shown here. If there are deviations between them, which forms do you like better? If you like yours, then GO WITH IT!

If you didn’t do the exercise yesterday, you can copy out this version and adopt it for the rest of this week’s activities.



 

 

THESSALONIANS: Day #4 – Wedged – Use in a Phrase

Today, we’re going to use the new ‘wedged’ font to write a scripture on practice paper.

I made a couple of additional variations to my letters to add interest. On the upper-case letters I drew a horizontal line at the mid-point and divided that in half and in half again. The result, more attention-getting word art.

I simply used a filled wedge on the lower-case letters.

Imagine what this would look like if you were writing a patriotic message and colored those upper stripes in alternating red and white while coloring the bottom half and the lower-case with blue! What other fun color combinations would you like to try?



 

 

THESSALONIANS: Day #5 – Wedged – Bible Page

Here we are at Friday again! Today we are using the new font in our Bible to write a scripture in the books of 1st or 2nd Thessalonians. I combined the upper case with a small script. Did you notice, I also made the tops of the wedges concave? This makes it at little more casual.

I wrote my letters in colored ink and then filled with a lighter color. I did this to keep the lettering from looking too harsh against the gentle coloring of the illustration (which is the hummingbird from this week’s Drawing Room). This is in my interleaved Bible.


And so we wrap up another week of lettering lessons for our bibles.

Ddd

 

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 7:51 PM PDT
Sunday, 23 June 2019
Proverbs in Lettering Lessons
Topic: Bible Journaling

Seems that many of the Proberbs are ideal for lettering decoratively. We'll take advantage of that in the lessons this week:

PROVERBS: Day #1 – Leading Loops – Introduction

This week we’re going to make enhancements to the basic round print font that will turn it into an elegant style.

For today, we’ll write the word ‘proverbs’ in upper- lower-case and in all-caps. Just work from these samples keeping in mind the very straight uprights and the very round bowls of the letters. Try to make the leading loops uniform and note that your serifs (one per letter) are only on the lower-case and are short and on an angle.


 

 

PROVERBS: Day #2a – Leading Loops – Review

There are TWO graphics today as I wanted to provide you with a quick review of the Basic Round Print. Practice writing this alphabet out to note the basic forms before you go on to the enhanced alphabet that shows the changes.


 

PROVERBS: Day #2b – Leading Loops – Alphabet

Compare this alphabet to the Basic Round Print just shown. Here are the elements that make up the enhancements: 1) capitals have a leading loop (make them consistent) 2) crossbars are curved 3) lower case have angled serifs (just one per letter) 4) x-height is ½ the overall letter height. Note the angle of the crossbar on the lower-case ‘f’ and ‘t’ and the angle on the lower-case ‘e’

Practice writing out this alphabet in pencil until it becomes natural to your hand. Then trace in ink and erase the pencil.


 

PROVERBS: Day #3 – Leading Loops – Getting There

Use the writing of these phrases to practice writing words and setting the steps to success in your mind.


 

PROVERBS: Day #4 – Leading Loops – Practice

Use the Leading Loops style to write out a scripture from the book of Proverbs. All this practice will prepare you for tomorrow’s activity of writing in your Bible.


 

PROVERBS: Day #5 – Leading Loops – Bible Page

This is a font that just seems to be made for writing scriptures. Isn’t it elegant?

With so much of the styling in the leading loops of the capitals, I think it looks best if you capitalize every word.

For my sample page, I combined the Leading Loops style with the ‘Country Church’ from the Drawing Room.


 

I often mention that I have combined the lettering on a bible page with art from the Drawing Room. I make a drawing tutorial every week for posting at www.Creative-Bible-Journaling.com. This is the drawing room I am referring to.

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 16 June 2019
Time for Lettering in the Psalms
Topic: Bible Journaling

Now on to some lettering in the Psalms - this one is FUN!

PSALMS: Day #1 – Stretched Novelty Oval – Intro

Now we will be reaching back into the archives for lettering styles taught in 2017 and investigating their roots and the things that make them unique. This week’s font had its roots in the basic oval font. However, the letters are skinnier and taller than the parent style.

Things to note about this style: 1) this is a mixed upper/lower case. 2) all of the elements of style take place in the upper third or lower third of the letters. Nothing happens in the center third. 3) the ‘bowls’ of the letters look like party balloons – an oval with a point where it attaches. 4) the letters are fully upright – no italics here. 5) some possible enhancements can be one set of double lines per letter and/or addition of hearts or other simple elements.

Work on these samples today and we’ll take it further tomorrow.

 


 

 

 

PSALMS: Day #2 – Stretched Novelty Oval – Alphabet

This is the full alphabet for the stretched oval novelty print. Here’s a review of the things to watch for that were pointed out yesterday:  1) this is a mixed upper/lower case. 2) all of the elements of style take place in the upper third or lower third of the letters. Nothing happens in the center third. 3) the ‘bowls’ of the letters look like party balloons – an oval with a point where it attaches. 4) the letters are fully upright – no italics here. 5) some possible enhancements can be one set of double lines per letter and/or addition of hearts or other simple elements.

If you do use the double lines, you can elect to fill them solid, fill with color or leave them open, as shown.

A set of numbers in the same style are included. These will come in handy when writing scripture references.

 


 

 

PSALMS: Day #3 – Stretched Novelty Oval – Text Block

Select a portion of the Psalms to write out using the font you’ve learned this week. Remember to pencil everything first, then ink the letters and, finally, erase your pencil. Check for spelling, missed letters, or wrong forms while you’re at the pencil stage!

I used a bullet tipped colored marker to draw a line right up against the left side of the tallest vertical on each letter.

 


 

 

PSALMS: Day #4 – Stretched Novelty Oval – Combo

Select another scripture from the Psalms and use your new font in a ‘word art’ piece by combining one to two other fonts with it. I have used an all-caps print, stretched horizontally and a basic script. These three fonts do not compete with one another.

I included a couple of simple illustrations in dashed lines that, with color, guide the eye through the text. Simple color blocking on the feature font ties it all together.

 


 

 

PSALMS: Day #5 – Stretched Novelty Oval – Bible Page

The final activity for the week is to use the new font in your bible. I chose to use a section of scripture in Psalms with a repetitive style and used the same fonts for the same parts of the phrases to build continuity.

When I got done lettering this, there were no natural places for the eye to make the change to a new thought. So, I thickened the letters on the featured font and then used a rainbow color-blocking to break the text into the separate sections.

I combined this scripture and text with the stone tablets from this week’s Drawing Room tutorial.

 


 

 

PSALMS: Day #6 – Stretched Novelty Oval – BONUS 1

I was having too much fun with this font to stop so I dreamed up a couple of further options. Make a copy of your original alphabet and add little curls to dress up the letters. This will give them an even more casual feel. Go for the unexpected like that changed up E and G. What fun is that unique X?

When you have it all figured out, ink it and erase the pencil. Then have some fun writing out a phrase with it.

 



 

 


 

 

The last variation I thought of for this font was changing it to a script by introducing letter connections. Start with your basic alphabet and design connections that make sense. Keep in mind that these will probably change as you write phrases with them.

If you want to play further, try adding thickened downstrokes!

 


 

 


 

 

This is obviously a font with a LOT of possibilities!

Ddd

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Thursday, 13 June 2019
Inspired By Jackie
Topic: Bible Journaling

In one of the Facebook groups I do bible journaling with we were provided with a rough sketch of a stream with a tree beside it.

I drew my own version and colored it with markers for use in my bible as tip-in art.

I can't even remember what book of the bible inspired the original art by Jackie, but I used mine in Genesis.


I added heart stickers to create the flowers.

Ddd

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 9 June 2019
Creative Bible Lettering - 1 and 2 Timothy
Topic: Bible Journaling

On to another lettering lesson!

1&2 TIMOTHY: Day 1 – Font Combos – Introduction

In beginning to combine fonts to make blocks of text that seem integrated, there are several options. You’ll find no hard and fast rules here – just suggestions for things you can try. These are just the basics this week. After this you can experiment and soon, you’ll be flying solo.

For the practice piece today, I want you to combine a basic round font with a basic script. I changed up my print to include a left-side doubled line and used all caps.

Scale is important, too. Reserve the large letters for the important words and use smaller, plainer letters for the conjunctions. Note that there are some extra flourishes on the script letters to help them hold their own against the double lines in the print.


 

 

1&2 TIMOTHY: Day 2 – Font Combos – The Basics

I decided to let the samples speak for themselves today. So, check out these two panels and note how the work described is being implemented. These are the two most basic formats: 1) a consistent style with various size changes and 2) mixing a basic print with a basic script.

You can write up any phrase you want for your own work, or copy the text from these.


 


 

1&2 TIMOTHY: Day 3 – Font Combos – Other Options

When using something other than the basic fonts, try to keep one plainer and one fancier. They should not be similar if they are not exact. (Match closely OR vary widely).

Sample two is a reminder to stick with 2-3 fonts. More than that looks cluttered and mismatched.

Whatever your font choices, try to use each font more than once. Use fonts with flair in styling or size for important words.

Use these or other phrases to write up to demonstrate the principles.


 


 

1&2 TIMOTHY: Day 4 – Font Combos – Scripture

Novelty prints are fun to include in your word art. You can bump up the interest on a word lettered in a very basic font by adding a banner to it.

Here is a sample scripture from 1 Timothy 6:12 you can practice on.

To make banners: 1) draw the main block with a slight arc 2) add the little triangles underneath 3) connect the triangles to the main body with flagged ends that also curve downward.


 

1&2 TIMOTHY: Day 5 – Font Combos – In Your Bible

This scripture in my bible uses just three fonts but looks more complicated than that. I used Faux-brush script, basic round print in serif and a block novelty print. Because these are all from different font families, they do not compete with one another.

Varying the sizes of the matching fonts helps to make it look more complex while consistent use of color throughout also helps with continuity.

Choose a scripture from either 1 or 2 Timothy and make some word art in your bible by combining fonts.


 

It’s great to learn how to use all these fonts in new and creative ways.

Ddd


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Sunday, 2 June 2019
Lettering In The Book Of Job
Topic: Bible Journaling

Time for another lettering lesson for use in our Bibles. This time the lessons were in the book of Job. Here are the daily posts:

 

JOB: Day 1 – Stacking Fonts – Intro

Now that we have advanced through many variations on basic letter structures, we are going to explore combining two styles at a time to create artistic ensembles.

For this introductory piece we will practice with the three letters of the book of Job.

Using pencil, sketch out the three block letters that will become your background. Outline them and color them in a light to medium marker. Erase your pencil.

Now use the pencil again to write one script letter on top of each block letter centering on the vertical. Design smooth connections for the letters. Ink the script letters and add the double lines that change them to faux-brush.

Erase you pencil lines and you have a beautifully designed piece of word art.


 

 

JOB: Day 2 – Stacking Fonts – Two To Try

For this piece, start with block letters but extend the line ends everywhere they cross. This is a design option that we did not study in the progressive series. Ink and erase the pencil. Add faux-brush letters over the corresponding block letter sharing the same base line. Also use faux-brush for the alternating lines.

The serif line works because the serifs mimic the over-strokes on the block letters and because we remain in all-caps.

The final line is also faux-brush but in a smaller scale. The repetition or echoing of similar elements are the means by which we are building continuity.


 

JOB: Day 3 – Stacking Fonts – All Color Combo

For today’s practice piece we are going to switch to a different lettering for the base. We will pencil in some tall basic oval print in sans-serif.

The layered text is no-caps basic script centered in the vertical.

Use a lighter/brighter marker to write the script. Then choose a darker marker to write the print, skipping the lines where they meet the script. This will make them appear to be in the background.

Erase your pencil to see the finished product.


 

JOB: Day 4 – Stacking Fonts – Novelty Layering

You get a whole different feel by layering ‘architect’ with ‘bubbles’. Pencil in your architect letters in upper and lower case then draw uniform circles in various places on each letter. Inside the bubbles, write the corresponding letter in basic round print in all-caps.

Trace the bubbles and their letters first. Then trace the architect letters only where they appear outside the bubbles.

Erase all the pencil. Color inside the bubbles with a lighter marker and trace the architect letters with a darker value of the same color marker.


 

JOB: Day 5 – Stacking Fonts – In Your Bible

For this piece, we will use an architect letter style with thickened downstrokes. This is written in color and the pencil erased.

Over the top we will use a basic script lettering, sharing the baseline with the print.

Notice that in all of the examples this week we combined one print style and one script style so the lettering will not compete.


 

That was a lot of fun, right?

Ddd

 

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT
Thursday, 30 May 2019
Alaska Original
Topic: Bible Journaling

On a recent cruise to Alaska, we had several hours exploring at Mendenhall Glacier. Magnificent!

Along the trail I spied some blue lupine blooms tucked into a shady spot and snapped a few photos of them.

When I got home I put the pictures through a photo editor with filters for different effects. I especially like this one with a pebbled look to it.


I overlaidthe text of a scripture over it and used it as art to glue into my interleaved bible.

Ddd

 


Posted by studio3d@ccgmail.net at 12:01 AM PDT

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